Immigration Law


FAMILY-BASED PETITIONS

Family-based immigration petitions enable a loved one to migrate to the United States. This may be a parent, spouse, sibling, or child. We pride ourselves on helping families stay together. Contact us so we can help you understand your options for helping relatives become lawful residents.


VICTIM-BASED PETITIONS

Many immigrants are vulnerable to abuse and exploitation but are too afraid to come forward to authorities, fearing deportation. Congress created T & U Visas to address this deplorable problem by protecting vulnerable victims and encouraging victims to report crimes. If you are a victim of a crime or trafficking, you may be eligible. There is also specific relief available for victims of domestic violence. Contact our office to discuss these options further.

EMPLOYMENT-BASED PETITIONS

Individuals who are skilled or educated, and who have job offers, have the possibility of immigrating to the U.S. Employment based immigration is a complex process involving many different Federal agencies and categories. If you are are seeking a visa or you are an employer seeking to sponsor individuals, we can help guide you through the process.


ASYLUM & REFUGEE PETITIONS

Refugee status or asylum may be granted to people who have been persecuted or fear they will be persecuted on account of race, religion, nationality, or membership in a particular social group or political opinion.

DEPORTATION DEFENSE

Cancellation of removal (deportation) is a limited form of relief available to certain permanent and non-permanent residents. It is available to non-permanent residents who have been in the U.S. continuously for at least 10 years upon a showing that an immediate U.S. citizen family member would suffer extreme hardship. Permanent residents put into removal proceedings following the conviction of a crime may also be eligible.


NON-IMMIGRANT PETITIONS

Non-immigrant visas, or temporary visas, are available to those individuals who intend to stay in the U.S. for a limited time and then return to their home country. This includes international students interested in studying in the U.S.